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Versione corrente di: Dan ,

Testo:

In my experience, the swollen battery affects the trackpad click first, and I've not personally known it affect a keyboard, but that doesn't mean it doesn't.
 
At least you can easily get these macbooks apart to check stuff, though, unlike the later ones. Trivial enough to remove the bottom, and you can generally see if the battery is swollen - to actually remove the battery you need a tri-lobe screwdriver and a healthy disregard for Apple's "do not remove" sticker. These ones aren't glued in so you'd have to be pretty careless to do any damage or risk a fire or anything.
 
I can't remember offhand what you have to remove to get at the keyboard ribbon connector, but disconnecting and reconnecting it *might* fix it - one or other line out on that would affect a whole row of keys.
 
Most likely, though, is water. These keyboards are super-sensitive to water ingress, and that tends to take out entire groups of keys at a time. It seems nigh on impossible to revive a keyboard that's had water get in, and, while replacement keyboards are available on ebay etc., there's a reason Apple don't bother and just replace the whole top cover.
 
There's an iFixit guide. You need to remove the motherboard, peel off the adhesive keyboard backlight assembly, then undo about sixty little screws. It takes a while. I had to do this on a 17" 2011 MBP, but for ages I just used a separate bluetooth keyboard instead. The water that had got into it was the *tiniest* splash, the sort of thing that could easily happen without you even noticing - e.g. someone slopping a small amount of water from a glass in a cafe while you were looking the other way or something. It'll work fine for a few minutes, then start getting intermittent, then get steadily worse as the water works its way into the layers of the keyboard.

Stato:

open

Post originale di: CarlW ,

Testo:

In my experience, the swollen battery affects the trackpad click first, and I've not personally known it affect a keyboard, but that doesn't mean it doesn't.

At least you can easily get these macbooks apart to check stuff, though, unlike the later ones. Trivial enough to remove the bottom, and you can generally see if the battery is swollen - to actually remove the battery you need a tri-lobe screwdriver and a healthy disregard for Apple's "do not remove" sticker. These ones aren't glued in so you'd have to be pretty careless to do any damage or risk a fire or anything.

I can't remember offhand what you have to remove to get at the keyboard ribbon connector, but disconnecting and reconnecting it *might* fix it - one or other line out on that would affect a whole row of keys.

Stato:

open