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Versione corrente di: goodolboydws ,

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To put th e best possible face on it, your “friend” the retired Master mechanic evidently forgot what compression unions are and are NOT designed for. Or are safe to use as….
These are BRASS parts, which are are designed to seal BRASS or NYLON TUBING only, and they are only to be used to provide a separable joint and a seal against internal leakage, and certainly NOT to join steel parts together to keep them together against pulling forces.
Brass is MUCH weaker than steel-and much less resistant to abrasion/wear.
Heck, brass compression unions not even rated to EVER be used on BRAKE lines, which should tell you something about their safety factors and reliability -according to the SAE powers that be.
Brass is MUCH weaker than steel to begin with EVEN WHEN USED AT THE AT THE SAME THICKNESS-which, being HOLLOW parts they are not, and are therefore porportionately weaker still.
-Brass compression unions are not designed for much strength against torsional or tensile or horizontal compression forces (twisting or pulling or compressing parallel to their length). In essense you are providing a “designed in”, failure point with such a connection as this part of your steering will undoubtedly fail FIRST, being the weakest point in a system composed using all other steel parts.
+Brass compression unions are not designed with much strength against torsional or tensile or horizontal compression forces (twisting or pulling or compressing parallel to their length) AFTER assembly. In essense you are providing a “designed in”, failure point with such a connection as this part of your steering will undoubtedly fail FIRST, being the weakest point in a system composed using all other steel parts.
Just hope you’re not coming around a sharp turn, driving fast or down a slope or doing anything across a slope when that joint comes apart……
-A FAR better "fix" would be to cut the tie rod, align the cut ends next to each other, mark whatever the new length requires, and then either remove the excess steel and weld the ends together or add what even length of NEW steel is required, then weld the 3 parts together.
+A Brass compression union also has little ability to take a bend and retain strength, so if you do see any bending in that joint DO NOT straighten it out (which would only make it weaker) replace it-a better way.
+
+A FAR better "fix" would be to cut the tie rod, align the cut ends next to each other, mark whatever the new length requires, and then either remove the excess steel and weld the ends together or add what even length of NEW steel is required, then weld the 3 parts together. Or just start with a fresh length of steel rod an add Heim joints if required to achieve the desired length and provide adjustability.

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Modifica di: goodolboydws ,

Testo:

To put th e best possible face on it, your “friend” the retired Master mechanic evidently forgot what compression unions are and are NOT designed for. Or are safe to use as….
These are BRASS parts, which are are designed to seal BRASS or NYLON TUBING only, and they are only to be used to provide a separable joint and a seal against internal leakage, and certainly NOT to join steel parts together to keep them together against pulling forces.
Brass is MUCH weaker than steel-and much less resistant to abrasion/wear.
Heck, brass compression unions not even rated to EVER be used on BRAKE lines, which should tell you something about their safety factors and reliability -according to the SAE powers that be.
Brass is MUCH weaker than steel to begin with EVEN WHEN USED AT THE AT THE SAME THICKNESS-which, being HOLLOW parts they are not, and are therefore porportionately weaker still.
Brass compression unions are not designed for much strength against torsional or tensile or horizontal compression forces (twisting or pulling or compressing parallel to their length). In essense you are providing a “designed in”, failure point with such a connection as this part of your steering will undoubtedly fail FIRST, being the weakest point in a system composed using all other steel parts.
Just hope you’re not coming around a sharp turn, driving fast or down a slope or doing anything across a slope when that joint comes apart……
+
+A FAR better "fix" would be to cut the tie rod, align the cut ends next to each other, mark whatever the new length requires, and then either remove the excess steel and weld the ends together or add what even length of NEW steel is required, then weld the 3 parts together.

Stato:

open

Post originale di: goodolboydws ,

Testo:

To put th e best possible face on it, your “friend” the retired Master mechanic evidently forgot what compression unions are and are NOT designed for.  Or are safe to use as….

These are BRASS parts, which are  are designed to seal BRASS or NYLON TUBING only,  and they are only to be used to provide a separable joint and a seal  against internal leakage, and certainly NOT to join steel parts together to keep them together against pulling forces.

Brass is MUCH weaker than steel-and much less resistant to abrasion/wear.

Heck, brass compression unions not even rated to EVER be used on BRAKE lines, which should tell you something about their safety factors and reliability -according to the SAE powers that be.

Brass is MUCH weaker than steel to begin with EVEN WHEN USED AT THE AT THE SAME THICKNESS-which, being HOLLOW parts they are not, and are therefore porportionately weaker still.

Brass compression unions  are not designed for much strength against torsional or tensile or horizontal compression forces (twisting or pulling or compressing parallel to their length).  In essense you are providing a “designed in”,  failure point with such a connection as this part of your steering will undoubtedly fail FIRST, being the weakest point in a system composed using all other steel parts.

Just hope you’re not coming around a sharp turn, driving fast or down a slope or doing anything across a slope when that joint comes apart……

Stato:

open