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Versione corrente di: johnsawyercjs ,

Testo:

The term "Penryn" refers to the processor/CPU chip, and the term "Santa Rosa" refers to the logic board chipset (several other chips besides the CPU). The Everymac website won't tell you what logic board chipset a Macbook contains, and it also doesn't use the references Penryn, Santa Rosa, etc. A better source for some of these terms is the utility "Mactracker", which can be downloaded from most Mac software websites. The processor (CPU) chip in the Early 2009 Macbook is a Penryn (P7350), but the logic board chipset is not the Santa Rosa, which supports only an 800 MHz system bus--since the system bus in the Early 2009 Macbook is 1066 MHz, the logic board chipset is the Montevina.
The term "Penryn" refers to the processor/CPU chip, and the term "Santa Rosa" refers to the logic board chipset (several other chips besides the CPU). The Everymac website won't tell you what logic board chipset a Macbook contains, and it also doesn't use the references Penryn, Santa Rosa, etc. A better source for some of these terms is the utility "Mactracker", which can be downloaded from most Mac software websites. The processor (CPU) chip in the Early 2009 Macbook is a Penryn (P7350), but the logic board chipset is not the Santa Rosa, which supports only an 800 MHz system bus--since the system bus in the Early 2009 Macbook is 1066 MHz, the logic board chipset is the Montevina.

Stato:

open

Post originale di: johnsawyercjs ,

Testo:

The processor (CPU) chip in the Early 2009 Macbook is a Penryn (P7350), but the logic board chipset is not the Santa Rosa, which supports only an 800 MHz system bus--since the system bus in the Early 2009 Macbook is 1066 MHz, the logic board chipset is the Montevina.

Stato:

open