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Versione corrente di: Nick ,

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What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. Beyond that, the capacitors should be inspected. In many cases, a complete recap will fix the problem.
 
If the capacitors look okay or a recap didn’t work, the problem usually lies with the power supply inverter or the panel backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. Mine lasted ~1 year with a recap and ended up failing when the backlight burned out on one end (usually black). This is usually indicated by one end being darker then the other. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume it’s a backlight tube failure.
 
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply won’t fix the problem because it’s a bad panel. Since the panel is so expensive since nobody makes itold and the remaining ones are inflated in price OR won’t last very long, it’s cheaper to get a newout of production (and expensive), you’re better off replacing your monitor and recyclerecycling this one. Beyond attempting to replace the capacitorsa capacitor replacement, it isn’t worth repairing the monitor.
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply won’t fix the problem because it’s a bad panel. Since the panel is so expensive since nobody makes itold and the remaining ones are inflated in price OR won’t last very long, it’s cheaper to get a newout of production (and expensive), you’re better off replacing your monitor and recyclerecycling this one. Beyond attempting to replace the capacitorsa capacitor replacement, it isn’t worth repairing the monitor.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. Beyond that, the capacitors should be inspected. In many cases, a complete recap will fix the problem.
 
If the capacitors look okay or a recap didn’t work, the problem usually lies with the power supply inverter or the panel backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. Mine lasted ~1 year with a recap and ended up failing when the backlight burned out on one endend (usually black). This is usually indicated by one end being darker then the other. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume it’s a backlight tube failure.
If the capacitors look okay or a recap didn’t work, the problem usually lies with the power supply inverter or the panel backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. Mine lasted ~1 year with a recap and ended up failing when the backlight burned out on one endend (usually black). This is usually indicated by one end being darker then the other. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume it’s a backlight tube failure.
 
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply won’t fix the problem because it’s a bad panel. Since the panel is so expensive since nobody makes it and the remaining ones are inflated in price OR won’t last very long, it’s cheaper to get a new monitor and recycle this one. Beyond attempting to replace the capacitors, it isn’t worth repairing the monitor.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. PastBeyond that, the first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and thatshould be inspected. In many cases, a complete recap will probably fix itthe problem.
What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. PastBeyond that, the first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and thatshould be inspected. In many cases, a complete recap will probably fix itthe problem.
 
If the capacitors look okay or recappinga recap didn’t work, the problem usually lies with the power supply inverter or the monitor didn't work, it's probably a panel fault related to the backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. When mine failed after theMine lasted ~1 year with a recap (which fixed it for a year),and ended up failing when the second problem I had was panel related. In my case, the actual tube was blackbacklight burned out on one side and flickered for a while before it burned out for goodend. This is usually indicated by one end being darker then the other. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume that's why it failedit’s a backlight tube failure.
If the capacitors look okay or recappinga recap didn’t work, the problem usually lies with the power supply inverter or the monitor didn't work, it's probably a panel fault related to the backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. When mine failed after theMine lasted ~1 year with a recap (which fixed it for a year),and ended up failing when the second problem I had was panel related. In my case, the actual tube was blackbacklight burned out on one side and flickered for a while before it burned out for goodend. This is usually indicated by one end being darker then the other. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume that's why it failedit’s a backlight tube failure.
 
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply would notwon’t fix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to fix it if it isn'tbecause it’s a capacitor problem because of the high likelyhoodbad panel. Since the panel is where the problem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact thatso expensive since nobody makes CCFL panels anymore, soit and the remaining stock tends to beones are inflated in price OR won’t last very expensive when you find them. They often cost so much it'slong, it’s cheaper to buyget a whole new monitor and recycle this one. Beyond attempting to recyclereplace the old onecapacitors, it isn’t worth repairing the monitor.
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply would notwon’t fix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to fix it if it isn'tbecause it’s a capacitor problem because of the high likelyhoodbad panel. Since the panel is where the problem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact thatso expensive since nobody makes CCFL panels anymore, soit and the remaining stock tends to beones are inflated in price OR won’t last very expensive when you find them. They often cost so much it'slong, it’s cheaper to buyget a whole new monitor and recycle this one. Beyond attempting to recyclereplace the old onecapacitors, it isn’t worth repairing the monitor.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. ThePast that, the first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and that will probably fix it.
What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. ThePast that, the first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and that will probably fix it.
 
If the capacitors look okay or recapping the monitor didn't work, it's probably a panel fault related to the backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. When mine failed after the recap (which fixed it for a year), the second problem I had was panel related. In my case, the actual tube was black on one side and flickered for a while before it burned out for good. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume that's why it failed.
 
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply would not fix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to fix it if it isn't a capacitor problem because of the high likelyhood the panel is where the problem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact that nobody makes CCFL panels anymore, so the remaining stock tends to be very expensive when you find them. They often cost so much it's cheaper to buy a whole new monitor and to recycle the old one.

Stato:

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

What I'd suggest you do is check for an image with a flashlight. If it's stable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube or capacitors. The first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and that will probably fix it.
 
If the capacitors look okay or recapping the monitor didn't work, it's probably a panel fault related to the backlight. Sometimes this is fixed with a power supply, but it rarely fixes the problem. When mine failed after the recap (which fixed it for a year), the second problem I had was panel related. In my case, the actual tube was black on one side and flickered for a while before it burned out for good. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume that's why it failed.
 
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply would not fix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to fix it if it isn't a capacitor problem because of the high likelyhood the panel is where the problem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact that nobody makes CCFL panels anymore, so the remaining stock tends to be very expensive when you find them. They often cost so much it's often cheaper to buy a whole new monitormonitor and to recycle the old one.
The problem in your case is it's likely like mine where a new power supply would not fix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to fix it if it isn't a capacitor problem because of the high likelyhood the panel is where the problem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact that nobody makes CCFL panels anymore, so the remaining stock tends to be very expensive when you find them. They often cost so much it's often cheaper to buy a whole new monitormonitor and to recycle the old one.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

AlongWhat I'd suggest you do is check for an image with capacitor failure, mine hada flashlight. If it's BER failure when thestable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube physically burned outor capacitors. The first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and that will probably fix it.
AlongWhat I'd suggest you do is check for an image with capacitor failure, mine hada flashlight. If it's BER failure when thestable, then it's likely a bad backlight tube physically burned outor capacitors. The first thing to do is to inspect the capacitors and see if they are good. If any of the caps are bad, replace the whole set and that will probably fix it.
 
Check for a image with a flashlight, and seeIf the capacitors look okay or recapping the monitor didn't work, it's reallyprobably a problem withpanel fault related to the backlight not working. If you havebacklight. Sometimes this is fixed with a imagepower supply, but it has no backlight it'srarely fixes the problem. When mine failed after the recap (which fixed it for a power supply board oryear), the second problem I had was panel issue. Takerelated. In my case, the monitor apartactual tube was black on one side and checkflickered for bad caps to figurea while before it burned out what the problem isfor good. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume that's why it failed.
Check for a image with a flashlight, and seeIf the capacitors look okay or recapping the monitor didn't work, it's reallyprobably a problem withpanel fault related to the backlight not working. If you havebacklight. Sometimes this is fixed with a imagepower supply, but it has no backlight it'srarely fixes the problem. When mine failed after the recap (which fixed it for a power supply board oryear), the second problem I had was panel issue. Takerelated. In my case, the monitor apartactual tube was black on one side and checkflickered for bad caps to figurea while before it burned out what the problem isfor good. I don't recommend removing it because it's hard to do without damage, but if it's not working it's safe to assume that's why it failed.
 
IfThe problem in your caps look good, chances are good thatcase is it's a backlight tube burnout rather then bad caps. If the caps are bulged it needs to be recapped and will probably come back to life with a set of brand new capacitors. While it is possiblelikely like mine where a new power supply may work, it's a gamble I would not suggest you take. It's almost always goingfix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to befix it if it isn't a bad panel. Panels are not worth repairing. The maincapacitor problem because of the high likelyhood the panel is where the cost of these panels has skyrocketed beingproblem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact that nobody makes CCFL based. They are no longer being producedpanels anymore, so the remaining stock tends to be very expensive when you find one, it will alwaysthem. They cost an arm and a legso much it's often cheaper to get.
The cost of
buy a whole new panel makes it more economical to find a working one used rather then repair the one you havemonitor.
IfThe problem in your caps look good, chances are good thatcase is it's a backlight tube burnout rather then bad caps. If the caps are bulged it needs to be recapped and will probably come back to life with a set of brand new capacitors. While it is possiblelikely like mine where a new power supply may work, it's a gamble I would not suggest you take. It's almost always goingfix it, since the problem is panel related. I wouldn't recommend even trying to befix it if it isn't a bad panel. Panels are not worth repairing. The maincapacitor problem because of the high likelyhood the panel is where the cost of these panels has skyrocketed beingproblem lies. This issue is made worse by the fact that nobody makes CCFL based. They are no longer being producedpanels anymore, so the remaining stock tends to be very expensive when you find one, it will alwaysthem. They cost an arm and a legso much it's often cheaper to get.
The cost of
buy a whole new panel makes it more economical to find a working one used rather then repair the one you havemonitor.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

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Along with capacitor failure, mine had it's BER failure when the backlight tube physically burned out.
 
Check for a image with a flashlight, and see it's really a problem with the backlight not working. If you have a image but it has no backlight it's a power supply board or panel issue. Take the monitor apart and check for bad caps to figure out what the problem is.
If
If
your caps look good, chances are good that it's a backlight tube burnout rather then bad caps. If the caps are bulged it needs to be recapped and will probably come back to life with a set of brand new capacitors. While it is possible a new power supply may work, it's a gamble I would not suggest you take. It's almost always going to be a bad panel.
A panel related failure is
Panels are not worth repairing. The panelsmain problem is the cost more then a secondhand one that works. These CCFLof these panels has skyrocketed being CCFL based. They are no longer being produced and good ones that remain are usually stupid expensive ifso when you do manage to find one due toone, it will always cost an arm and a lackleg to get.
The cost
of demanda new panel makes it more economical to find a working one used rather then repair the one you have.
If
If
your caps look good, chances are good that it's a backlight tube burnout rather then bad caps. If the caps are bulged it needs to be recapped and will probably come back to life with a set of brand new capacitors. While it is possible a new power supply may work, it's a gamble I would not suggest you take. It's almost always going to be a bad panel.
A panel related failure is
Panels are not worth repairing. The panelsmain problem is the cost more then a secondhand one that works. These CCFLof these panels has skyrocketed being CCFL based. They are no longer being produced and good ones that remain are usually stupid expensive ifso when you do manage to find one due toone, it will always cost an arm and a lackleg to get.
The cost
of demanda new panel makes it more economical to find a working one used rather then repair the one you have.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

Along with capacitor failure, mine failed for realhad it's BER failure when the second time because of backlight failure. If it still gives you problems with new capacitors, then checktube physically burned out.
Check
for a image with external light. If that's the case, the inverter components ona flashlight, and see it's really a problem with the backlight not working. If you have a image but it has no backlight it's a power supply failedboard or panel issue. Take the CCFL tubing usedmonitor apart and check for bad caps to lightfigure out what the panel burned out. Once you have toproblem is.
If your caps
look into the inverter or panel, the monitor is probablygood, chances are good that it's a write-off, seeing as the black screen failure is usually a CCFLbacklight tube burnout inrather then bad caps. If the majoritycaps are bulged it needs to be recapped and will probably come back to life with a set of casesbrand new capacitors. While it happens. Ais possible a new power supply may be in line but ifwork, it's a gamble I would not suggest you replace it and it's the CCFL tube (which is more likely) then it'stake. It's almost always going to needbe a newbad panel. This
A
panel related failure is not worth repairing. The panels cost more then a secondhand one that works. These CCFL and probablypanels are no longer made. If it is, it's veryproduced and good ones that remain are usually stupid expensive if you do manage to find one due to thea lack of demand for CCFL panelsdemand.
Along with capacitor failure, mine failed for realhad it's BER failure when the second time because of backlight failure. If it still gives you problems with new capacitors, then checktube physically burned out.
Check
for a image with external light. If that's the case, the inverter components ona flashlight, and see it's really a problem with the backlight not working. If you have a image but it has no backlight it's a power supply failedboard or panel issue. Take the CCFL tubing usedmonitor apart and check for bad caps to lightfigure out what the panel burned out. Once you have toproblem is.
If your caps
look into the inverter or panel, the monitor is probablygood, chances are good that it's a write-off, seeing as the black screen failure is usually a CCFLbacklight tube burnout inrather then bad caps. If the majoritycaps are bulged it needs to be recapped and will probably come back to life with a set of casesbrand new capacitors. While it happens. Ais possible a new power supply may be in line but ifwork, it's a gamble I would not suggest you replace it and it's the CCFL tube (which is more likely) then it'stake. It's almost always going to needbe a newbad panel. This
A
panel related failure is not worth repairing. The panels cost more then a secondhand one that works. These CCFL and probablypanels are no longer made. If it is, it's veryproduced and good ones that remain are usually stupid expensive if you do manage to find one due to thea lack of demand for CCFL panelsdemand.

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Modifica di: Nick ,

Testo:

Along with capacitor failure, mine failed for real the second time because of backlight failure. If it still gives you problems with new capacitors, then check for a image with external light. If that's the case, the inverter components on the power supply failed or the CCFL tubing used to light the panel burned out. Once you have to look into the inverter or panel, the monitor is probably a write-off, seeing as the black screen failure is usually a CCFL burnout in the majority of cases it happens. A new power supply may be in line but if you replace it and it's the CCFL tube (which is more likely) then it's going to need a new panel. This panel is CCFL and probably no longer made. If it is, it's very expensive due to the lack of demand for CCFL panels.
Along with capacitor failure, mine failed for real the second time because of backlight failure. If it still gives you problems with new capacitors, then check for a image with external light. If that's the case, the inverter components on the power supply failed or the CCFL tubing used to light the panel burned out. Once you have to look into the inverter or panel, the monitor is probably a write-off, seeing as the black screen failure is usually a CCFL burnout in the majority of cases it happens. A new power supply may be in line but if you replace it and it's the CCFL tube (which is more likely) then it's going to need a new panel. This panel is CCFL and probably no longer made. If it is, it's very expensive due to the lack of demand for CCFL panels.

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Post originale di: Nick ,

Testo:

Along with capacitor failure, mine failed for real the second time because of backlight failure. If it still gives you problems with new capacitors, then check for a image with external light. If that's the case, the inverter components on the power supply failed or the CCFL tubing used to light the panel burned out.

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